Home > Consultant Tips, Senior Wellness, Wellness Programming > Activity Beyond Weight-loss

Activity Beyond Weight-loss

When we think of physical activity and wellness we often think of  “let’s get the overweight to move toward a healthier weight.”  Great goal, for sure.  When we are dedicated to improving quality of life, productivity and reducing the costs of debilitating disease the case for increasing physical activity reaches far beyond a weight-loss goal.
There is a growing body of research that leading an active life, especially after retirement, appears to be one of the most important things one can do in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease. “Passive lifestyle is increasingly seen by researchers as a high risk factor for Alzheimer’s, a still incurable disease of the brain that causes the progressive degeneration of brain cells,” explains Dr. Cummings in his article. He goes on to say, “We have a social idea of what retirement consists of and we need to re-examine that idea.”
One of the studies that Dr. Cummings uses to illustrate his point is a study published in the Archives of General Psychiatry. The results of that study indicate that people who say their lives have a purpose are less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease or mild cognitive impairment.  There is a clear scientific correlation between staying active and improving your chances of avoiding, or at least postponing, cognitive impairment.

When we think of physical activity and wellness we often think of “let’s get the overweight to move toward a healthier weight.”  Great goal, for sure.  When we are dedicated to improving quality of life, productivity and reducing the costs of debilitating disease the case for increasing physical activity reaches far beyond a weight-loss goal.There is a growing body of research that leading an active life, especially after retirement, appears to be one of the most important things one can do in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease. “Passive lifestyle is increasingly seen by researchers as a high risk factor for Alzheimer’s, a still incurable disease of the brain that causes the progressive degeneration of brain cells,” explains Dr. Cummings in the article. He goes on to say, “We have a social idea of what retirement consists of and we need to re-examine that idea.”
One of the studies that Dr. Cummings uses to illustrate his point is a study published in the Archives of General Psychiatry. The results of that study indicate that people who say their lives have a purpose are less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease or mild cognitive impairment.  There is a clear scientific correlation between staying active and improving your chances of avoiding, or at least postponing, cognitive impairment.

Advertisements
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: